Training Program

Learn more about race day preparation…

Beginning
MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN
Week 1
4/15-4/21
1 mile walk 1 mile run 1 mile walk 1-2 mile run 1 mile walk 2 mile run Rest
Week 2
4/22-4/28
1 mile run 2 mile run 1 mile walk 2 mile run 1 mile walk 3 mile run Rest
Week 3
4/29-5/5
2 mile run 2 mile run 1 mile walk 3 mile run 1 mile walk 4 mile run Rest
Week 4
5/6-5/12
2 mile run 3 mile run 1 mile walk 3 mile run 1 mile walk 5 mile run Rest
Week 5
5/13-5/19
1 mile walk 3 mile run 1 mile walk 3 mile run 2 mile walk Rest 10K Race

The above plan is for beginning runners and is designed to get you to the finish line of the Santa Monica Classic 10K (or, 6.2 miles). Days of the week are not assigned to any particular run because you all have your own individual schedules and obligations, and it makes more sense to get your run in on a day you can rather than to skip it simply because you are too busy on a particular day.

The runs in bold are runs that you should not skip. Thus, you should plan to run at least three times a week. If you have the time, desire, and ability to run more frequently, add in the other suggested runs as you wish. You should not worry about how fast you are running. Instead, run at a normal pace that allows you to hold a conversation while running. Because running with others is often more pleasant than running alone, consider getting together with other runners for your running.

Intermediate
MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN
Week 1
4/15-4/21
2 mile run 3 mile workout 2 mile run 3 mile run 2 mile run 4 mile run Rest
Week 2
4/22-4/28
2 mile run 4 mile workout 2 mile run 3 mile run 2 mile run 5 mile run Rest
Week 3
4/29-5/5
2 mile run 5 mile workout 2 mile run 3 mile run 2 mile run 6 mile run Rest
Week 4
5/6-5/12
2 mile run 5 mile workout 2 mile run 3 mile run 2 mile run 7 mile run Rest
Week 5
5/13-5/19
2 mile run 5 mile workout 2 mile run 3 mile run 2 mile run Rest 10K Race

The above plan is for intermediate runners who plan to run the Santa Monica Classic 10K at a pace faster than their normal running pace, but do not currently run any structured track workouts. Unless you are already running at least 10 miles per week, use the beginning runner plan. Days of the week are not assigned to any particular run because you all have your own individual schedules and obligations, and it makes more sense to get your run in on a day you can rather than to skip it simply because you are too busy on a particular day.

The runs in bold are runs that you should not skip. Thus, you should plan to run at least four times a week. If you have the time, desire, and ability to run more frequently, add in the other suggested runs as you wish. For most of the runs, do not worry about how fast you are running. Instead, run at a normal pace that allows you to hold a conversation while running. However, for the “4 mile workout,” you should run at your normal pace for the first 10 minutes. For the next 16 minutes, alternate running your 10K goal pace for 2 minutes and running a little easier than your normal pace for 2 minutes. Run the remaining distance of your run at your normal pace. For the “5 mile workout,” you should run at your normal pace for the first 10 minutes. For the next 24 minutes, alternate running your 10K goal pace for 2 minutes and running a little easier than your normal pace for 2 minutes. Run the remaining distance of your run at your normal pace.

Advanced
MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT SUN
Week 1
4/15-4/21
3 mile run 5 mile workout 3-4 mile run 4 mile speed workout 3 mile run 8 mile run Rest
Week 2
4/22-4/28
3 mile run 6 mile workout 3-4 mile run 5 mile speed workout 3 mile run 9 mile run Rest
Week 3
4/29-5/5
3 mile run 7 mile workout 3-4 mile run 6 mile speed workout 3 mile run 10 mile run Rest
Week 4
5/6-5/12
3 mile run 8 mile workout 3-4 mile run 7 mile speed workout 3 mile run 9 mile run Rest
Week 5
5/13-5/19
3 mile run 7 mile workout 3-4 mile run 5 mile speed workout 3 mile run Rest 10K Race

The above plan is for advanced runners who run at least 20 miles per week with a weekly long run of at least 7 miles, and occasionally run at a faster than normal pace at least once a week. Days of the week are not assigned to any particular run because you all have your own individual schedules and obligations, and it makes more sense to get your run in on a day you can rather than to skip it simply because you are too busy on a particular day.

The runs in bold are runs that you should not skip. Thus, you should plan to run at least four times a week. If you have the time, desire, and ability to run more frequently, add in the other suggested runs as you wish. For most of the runs, do not worry about how fast you are running. Instead, run at a normal pace that allows you to hold a conversation while running. However, for the “pace workout,” run your normal pace for the first and last 10 minutes. For the middle minutes, alternate running your 10K goal pace for 4 minutes and running easier than your normal pace for 3 minutes. For the “speed workout,” run your normal pace for the first and last 10 minutes. For the middle minutes, alternate running your mile pace (usually about 45 seconds faster per mile than your 10K pace) for 2 minutes and running easier than your normal pace for 2 minutes.

Training Program by

Eric Barron

Head Coach, Track Club LA